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Michigan Direct Entry MSN

If you have a bachelor's degree and you're ready to make a career change, the field of nursing is waiting for you! You don't need a bachelor's degree in nursing or any experience in the field to start working towards an MSN. Michigan's direct entry MSN programs make the most of your bachelor's degree and allow you to progress to your Master of Science in Nursing within first completing a seperate BSN program.

To find programs that allow you to earn your MSN while considering credits from your previous non-nursing degree, have a look at the schools on our site. You can request program materials to learn more.

These degree programs are fairly fast-paced, so you can get started in your new career relatively quickly. In most cases, these programs typically last between 18 and 36 months. Plan on working over 40 hours per week to meet your school's clinical and classroom requirements.

Before you can build your graduate-level nursing skills and understanding of nursing theories, you need to become a registered nurse (RN). This is why the early semesters of your curriculum will focus on BSN courses. Required courses include Nursing Concepts and Interventions, Family Centered Nursing, Theoretical Foundations of Nursing, and Health Promotion. As you may expect, these courses focus heavily on clinical work, which may include over 600 clinical hours of practice.

Graduate-level courses are designed to give you a deeper understanding of nursing theory, expand your knowledge of health care systems, and give you the skills you need to work in a variety of nursing settings. Theory courses you may take include Graduate Pathophysiology, Graduate Pharmacology, and Graduate Epidemiology. Courses that focus on hands-on experience and clinical work include Management of Acute/Chronic Problems, Advanced Practice Care, and Mental Health for Advanced Practice.

If you choose a field other than nurse midwifery, nurse practitioner, or nurse anesthesia, your practical hours may take place in a non-clinical setting. Nursing education students will likely finish their training in ADN or BSN courses, working with student. Nurse executives may work in an administrative setting. Those who go into nurse research may spend much of their time in a laboratory.

In the field of nursing, there are many scholarships, and other financial aid opportunities that can make your education more affordable. The Michigan Center for Nursing offers over one dozen scholarships. The Michigan Nurses Foundation funds at least four scholarships each year, each one worth at least $1,000. Each academic year, the Michigan League for Nursing awards scholarships to high-performing nursing students.

Different nursing careers have different licensing requirements, so make sure that you're following all the laws before you start your career! The Michigan Board of Nursing oversees nurses' careers and licenses. Non-clinical specialties, such as administration and research, do not have special licenses. Each clinical specialty, from nurse practitioner to nurse anesthetist, has its own licensing process. Typically, you have to pass a rigorous exam and register as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse.

Michigan salaries tend to be slightly higher than national averages, although salaries are different between the Upper Peninsula and the Lower Peninsula. Nurse anesthetists tend to be the highest-paid nurses in Michigan, earning an average of $169,700 per year (O*Net, 2013). The average salary for a nurse practitioner is $88,800 per year. On the lower end of the scale, nurse instructors have a median salary of $70,600 per year and medical managers earn an average of $83,600 per year (O*Net, 2013).

Earning an MSN can yield many benefits for you and for your community. Personally, you may find great career satisfaction and challenging career opportunities in nursing. Meanwhile, your dedication to the field and to your nursing specialty can enhance the field of nursing. Request information from the schools you see here to learn more about direct entry MSN programs in Michigan.